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society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
, a little california adventure, to mar run county, california, after being in manhattan or brooklyn for 21, 22 years. >> host: why'd you move out there? >> guest: we wanted to try something different. our kids were at a nice age where they were out of diapers, but today didn't yet have girlfriends -- [laughter] and we have three boys. and we have this nice thing where we can kind of live anywhere because we have a lot of flexibility. i don't have to go into a office, my wife -- who used to work at mtv -- isn't working there now. and so -- >> host: may we ask who your wife is? >> guest: my wife is alexa robinson, she was a producer at mtv. she wasn't a vijay. >> host: okay. >> guest: and she -- and so we wanted to try and go on some kind of adventure with the kids to take advantage of the fact that we can live anywhere. and i've always loved northern california, and i have a lot of friends out there. because of all the technology projects that i've been involved with and things that i've written about, you know, it was helpful professionally to be out there for a while. so we've been off on
. on marriage they were decisive to pass proposition 8 in california, 50% voted for proposition 8 in california. we are extremely conservative and we also have to understand that there's a big difference between the old latino community of some 20 or 30 years ago what i call the cesar chavez latino community, the puerto ricans in new york and chicago and those in the southwest since the u.s. basically took half of mexico and the new population which is 40% foreign-born and the rest of the children of immigrants come a very conservative i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary that we get caught up in the polls we've seen it in this election cycle and besides pulling them with specific issues if we had a better understanding of what they are coming from you would get an understanding of why they are answering the question, but i believe with the latino community we lost the vote because of immigration. if we would have had a better position on immigration from the get go come from the primary government romney would have been competitive in those battle
to life. on marriage, latinos were decisive to pass proposition eight in california, 53% of latinos voted for proposition eight in california. we are extremely conservative. i think, and we also have to understand there's some difference between the old latino community of say 20, 30 years ago what i call the cesar chavez a team community, and, the new york, the puerto ricans in new york and chicago, and those in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we
. i met a woman in california who was adopted in her 40's because she was reunited with a woman who used to care for her, she grew up in foster care, became successful but when they were reunited they still loved each other the same way they had done 40 years earlier and decided to be a family. it's quite a miracle of loving and bonding that happens through adoption. frank and i, my lus and i are so proud to be the parents of two extraordinary chirp who happen to be adopted. we've built our family through adoption. my husband was, in fact, adopted out of an orphanage from ireland when he was 5 years old and still remembers the day when the may tron of this little brought assistant home for children came up and walked up to him and said ernest, pack your bags, your mom and dad are here to take you home. he saw his mother and father, adoptive mother and daughter father, brother and sister, and the rest is history, came to america and received an excellent education, has gone on to be a wonderful, wonderful citizen, of course, a great father and loving husband. so grateful for that opp
yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i'm going to be very proud to support amendment 2985. i think it has to do with our military readiness. i think it has to do with our national security. and i think the fact that we have this opportunity is commendable, and i want to thank senator udall for it. striking section 313 is important because that section harms d.o.d.'s ability to diversify its fuel supplies by developing and using effective alternative fuels. now, you know, lots of colleagues can come down here and proclaim thi this isn't important or it is important. you know what? i want to listen to the d.o.d. themselves and what they say. there was an armed forces press service news report in july 2012. and this is what they said: and i quote -- "smart investing and less reliance on petroleum-based fuels will help ensure an agile, lethal and adaptable combat force and ultimately national security. " so, mr. president -- mr. president, i was distraught when i heard that the armed services committee by one vote put in this
say on a personal level when he was out in the wilds of california which is someplace beyond the appalachians, i think -- [laughter] i used to turn to his writings when he was at rand to really understand what was going on in northeast asia. i didn't know him then. but i was always, i found myself always in agreement which, of course, moment his writing was really terrific. [laughter] but without further ado, jeff, please. >> um, thanks, alan. and it's daunting coming up here after that first really outstanding panel which had three presentations which each took different perspectives on the situation in the wake of the party congress and complemented each other really magnificently. i want to say briefly at the outset how i see the current shape of the u.s./china relationship. i see it as basically in decent shape. i don't see the downward spiral or rising confrontation that i read about frequently in the media and some scowly commentary both in the united states and in china. to illustrate that, "the new york times" over the weekend had an article about president obama's cu
, it was the marriage amendment in california. and if you look at why it won, because it was a crossover of hispanics and most especially black pastors that joined the republicans. is so rather than look at hispanics and blacks from the standpoint of what we white people want to look at, why not ask them what they're interested in? why not look at their values and their cultural agenda and their priorities and address that? and that's where there's great common ground, and i simply don't understand why republicans seemingly are afraid of their own shadow when it comes to that. >> [inaudible] briefly touched on. in the first national election, race and gay marriage, there were a couple ballot initiatives that were successful in that regard. is gay marriage accepted in mainstream america, and -- [inaudible] toward the conservative movement? >> this is an issue that is very much under debate. you're right, there were four blue states yesterday that approved gay marriage, most of them by very, very narrow margins that were far less than the margins in the state legislatures of some of those states. what
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8